October 19, 2015

Orange Butterfly(Speyeria Cybele)

By

While Free Ranging the WooFPAK the WooFDriver was lucky to see this Orange Butterfly(Speyeria Cybele) on some purple flowers. They lay their eggs in late summer on or near the host plants of violets. When the caterpillars hatch they do not feed, they overwinter until spring when they eat young violet leaves.

Butterflies and Moths of North America’s Website to learn more about this butterfly

Posted in: Insects
October 12, 2015

Moth

By

On July 21, 2014 at the farm Free Ranging the WooFPAK. We came across this thirsty little moth! To avoid being eaten, some moths are notorious for their ability to look like other animals. They have evolved to look like less tasty insects like wasps, tarantulas and praying mantis.

Wikipedia’s Moth Webpage

Please enjoy this album of Moths the WooFDriver has captured!
Moth

Posted in: Insects
October 9, 2015

Variegated Fritillary Butterfly

By

July 28, 2014 while Free Range Running the WooFPAK we came across this little butterfly, a Variegated Fritillary Butterfly. We were in it’s habitat of open areas like pastures, fields and prairies. It’s host plants include Woodland Stonecrop, Passion Flowers and Voilet.

Learn more here about this butterfly, and other butterfies.

Enjoy this album of these beautiful butterflies WooFDriver has captured on a couple different occasions!
Variegated Fritillary Butterfly

Posted in: Insects
October 9, 2015

Common Conehead Cricket

By

July 31, 2014 found this little creature! Common Conehead Cricket(Neoconocephalus sp.) are mostly active during summer and early fall, when meadow grasses are at their peak. Be careful, as some can give a strong bite due to strong jaws from chewing on tough grasses.

Learn more here, and to identify other insects.

Posted in: Insects
October 9, 2015

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterflies

By

Whether out Free Range Running, Lure Coursing or Mushing along the trails with the WooFPAK, these Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterflies(Papilio glaucus) seem to follow. The WooFDriver has be able to see and capture these beautiful butterflies on several occasions.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtails are usually solitary and can be seen flying high above the ground, higher than the tree canopy. Some common hosts plants are the tulip tree, sweet bay magnolia, and wild black cherry. The males are a bright yellow and the females can exhibit two different color combinations, yellow and black or black and blue. The darker colors are more common in the southern states.

Learn more about the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly

Another great website for learning about butterflies.

Enjoy this album of Swallowtails the WooFDriver has captured along his adventures!
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterflies

Posted in: Insects
October 9, 2015

Differential Grasshopper

By

hoppertextAugust 18, 2014 we caught a glimpse of a beautiful grasshopper while running with the WooFPAK. I believe it to be the Differential Grasshopper(Melanoplus differentialis). They are considered a pest in most regions for crops and found throughout North America. A single swarm can take out a young crop within a few days. However, they are cool to look at and hear at night! I believe all creatures have their place in the world.

Learn more about the Differential Grasshopper here.

Posted in: Insects
October 8, 2015

Monarch Butterfly

By

August 27, 2014 in the Shenandoah Valley with the WooFPAK, WooFDriver was able to capture this Monarch Butterfly. They are known for their incredible mass migration of up to 3,000 miles bringing millions of butterflies to California and Mexico each winter. Learn more about Monarch Butterflies

Enjoy this photo album of Monarch Butterflies found on the WooFPAK’s adventures!
Monarch Butterfly

Posted in: Insects
October 8, 2015

Cabbage White Butterfly

By

butterOn September 5, 2014 while Free Range Running the WooFPAK in the Shenandoah Valley we were able to see a lot of different kinds of wildlife. This included this Cabbage White Butterfly(Pieris Rapae) landing on these beautiful yellow flowers. It got it’s name from the crops it likes to feed, the cabbage family of plants, but prefers broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower. This makes this butterfly a pest amongst farmers, but beautiful in a different respect.

Wikipedia’s Webpage to learn more about the Cabbage White Butterfly and also here Department of Horticulture at Oregon State University

Posted in: Insects
October 8, 2015

Black Swallowtail Butterfly

By

September 5, 2014 in the Shenandoah Valley while Free Range Running with the WooFPAK, WooFDriver was about to snap a picture of this beautiful Black Swallowtail Butterfly(Papilio Polyxenes). Their habitat are gardens, hills and open areas like the meadow where the WooFPAK loves to run!

Wikipedia’s Webpage for the Black Swallowtail for more information.

Enjoy this album of these beautiful butterflies captured by the WooFDriver!
Black Swallowtail Butterfly

Posted in: Insects
October 8, 2015

Spotted Orb Weaver

By

The little spider pictured above we saw on our Free Ranging Run on September 18, 2014. I believe it to be a Spotted Orb Weaver. They can be found everywhere you go outside like in woodlands, fields, gardens, parks, and backyards. Mostly active in the summer months of May and August, these hairy spiders are nocturnal but it is not unusual to see one during the day. Read More About the Spotted Orb Weaver and other species here.

Please enjoy the photos of this species of spider captured overtime:
Spotted Orb Weaver Spider

Posted in: Insects